speed


speed
speed n 1 *haste, hurry, expedition, dispatch
Analogous words: *celerity, legerity, alacrity: fleetness, rapidity, swiftness, quickness (see corresponding adjectives at FAST): velocity, pace, headway (see SPEED)
2 Speed, velocity, momentum, impetus, pace, headway are comparable but not all mutually synonymous terms that basically apply to motion through space.
Speed (see also HASTE n) denotes rate of motion, a value computable by dividing the distance covered by the time taken
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a car that covers 300 miles in 6 hours has an average speed of 50 miles an hour

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Velocity denotes the speed of something that is directed along a given path. Ordinarily velocity suggests rate of motion in a straight line (linear velocity) or in an arc or circle (angular velocity)
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the velocity of a bullet

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the velocity of a skier

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velocity of a wind

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velocity of light

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a body rotating about a fixed axis with a constant angular velocity

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Momentum in general or casual use may take the place of speed or velocity, but in technical use it denotes not rate of motion but quantity of motion, a value determinable by multiplying the mass of a moving body by its velocity
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a falling stone gathers momentum

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the momentum of an iron ball rolling down an inclined plane is greater than that of a cork ball of the same diameter rolling with the same velocity

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as photons are always in motion, we may also speak of the momentum of a photon, much as we speak of the momentum of a motorcar— Jeans

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Impetus (see also STIMULUS) is a popular rather than technical synonym of momentum. In practice it is a closer synonym of impulse in the sense of the effect of an impelling force, for it regularly carries an implication of a rushing upon or an onset, with the result that it usually suggests great momentum or implies a powerful driving force as the cause of such momentum
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whether the steam . . . retains sufficient impetus to carry it to our shores— T. H. Huxley

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the circulating blood receives a new impetus from the contraction of the ventricles of the heart

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Pace belongs here not as a technical term but as a term in general use to denote the speed of or as if of one (as a person or horse) going afoot
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he set the pace for his companions on the hike

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the pace was too slow for the rest of the party

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Pace often finds extended use in describing such things as activities, progress, or rate of production
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keep pace with the times

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the factories were asked to increase their pace

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in New York he had moved on from speed to speed and from height to height, keeping pace with all the most magnificent developments in the furious city— Wolfe

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Headway basically applies to motion forward and in this sense is used chiefly in reference to ships
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he started the screw turning until the African Queen was just making headway against the current— Forester

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However it frequently denotes rate of movement ahead and then is used in reference not only to ships but to whatever is capable of advancing or making progress
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our mutual security program had suffered a year of lost headwayBarnett

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the independent movements of nominalism and German mysticism made great headway—Thilly[i]

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speed vb Speed, accelerate, quicken, hasten, hurry, precipitate can mean to go or make go fast or faster.
Speed emphasizes rapidity of motion or progress; as a transitive verb it suggests an increase in tempo; as an intransitive verb, a high degree of swiftness
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speed up an engine

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speed up the work in a factory

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the bullet sped through the air

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arrested for speeding

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the stoutest of the boatmen seized the staff out of turn and sped our craft forward— Wain

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Accelerate stresses increase in rate of motion or progress; it does not necessarily imply speed
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accelerated his pace so as to overtake the leaders

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a rich soil accelerates the growth of most plants

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accelerate the speed of a car

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History of late has accelerated her pace. Where once she moved slowly . . . she has within the past decade raced forward jet-propelled— J. M. Brown

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excitement was accelerating moment by moment, like the wheels of the train— Capote

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Quicken stresses shortening of the time consumed, often with a suggestion of animation or stimulation
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exercise quickens the pulse

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a broad and continuous education that quickens understanding of the modern world— Sidney Hook

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Hasten implies urgent quickness or a quick or premature outcome
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has-tened to apologize

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the annoyance and terror he lived in must have greatly hastened his early and unhappy death— Stevenson

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the science of archaeology is advancing into the past almost as rapidly as physics and electronics are hastening the future— Time

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Hurry implies haste that causes confusion or prevents concentrated attention
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his aim was hurried and his shot went wide of the mark

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a second fear . . . which madly hurries her she knows not whither— Shak

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these defects might pass more easily in a turbulent romanticist, hurrying pell-mell to get expressed some moving and dramatic scene, careless of details— Fry

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Precipitate implies impetuousness, suddenness, or abruptness
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men will not bide their time, but will insist on precipitating the march of affairs— Buckle

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its ruin was precipitated by religious persecution— J. R. Green

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Analogous words: *advance, forward, further, promote: *adjust, regulate, fix

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • Speed — bezeichnet: die Droge Amphetamin Speed (Kartenspiel), ein Kartenspiel Speed, einen Schokoriegel der Aldi Süd Kette; siehe Twix#Nachahmungen Speedklettern in Kurzform Speed – The Ride, eine Achterbahn im Nascar Café Speed: No Limits, eine… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Speed — Speed, n. [AS. sp?d success, swiftness, from sp?wan to succeed; akin to D. spoedd, OHG. spuot success, spuot to succees, Skr. sph[=a] to increase, grow fat. [root]170b.] 1. Prosperity in an undertaking; favorable issue; success. For common speed …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • speed — [spēd] n. [ME sped < OE spæd, wealth, power, success, akin to spowan, to prosper, succeed < IE base * spēi , to flourish, expand > SPACE, SPARE] 1. the act or state of moving rapidly; swiftness; quick motion 2. a) the rate of movement or …   English World dictionary

  • Speed — Speed, v. t. 1. To cause to be successful, or to prosper; hence, to aid; to favor. Fortune speed us! Shak. [1913 Webster] With rising gales that speed their happy flight. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to make haste; to dispatch with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • speed — [ spid ] n. m. et adj. • 1968; mot angl., proprt « vitesse » ♦ Anglic. fam. 1 ♦ Amphétamine, L. S. D. Prendre du speed. 2 ♦ Adj. Qui a pris des amphétamines. ♢ Très agité, excité. Elle est speed, la directrice ! speed [spid] n. m. et adj. ÉTYM.… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Speed — 〈[ spi:d]〉 I 〈m. 6; Sp.〉 1. Geschwindigkeit 2. Geschwindigkeitssteigerung II 〈n. 15; Drogenszene〉 Aufputschmittel, z. B. Amphetamin [engl.] * * * …   Universal-Lexikon

  • speed — ► NOUN 1) the rate at which someone or something moves or operates. 2) rapidity of movement or action. 3) each of the possible gear ratios of a bicycle. 4) the light gathering power or f number of a camera lens. 5) the duration of a photographic… …   English terms dictionary

  • Speed — Speed, NC U.S. town in North Carolina Population (2000): 70 Housing Units (2000): 60 Land area (2000): 0.283009 sq. miles (0.732990 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.283009 sq. miles (0.732990 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Speed — (sp[=e]d), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sped} (sp[e^]d), {Speeded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Speeding}.] [AS. sp[=e]dan, fr. sp[=e]d, n.; akin to D. spoeden, G. sich sputen. See {Speed}, n.] 1. To go; to fare. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] To warn him now he is too… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • speed|up — speed up or speed|up «SPEED UHP», noun. an increase in speed, as in some process or work: »Among the urgent areas for study, the report included…speed up of boarding and deplaning procedures (Science News Letter) …   Useful english dictionary


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